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Funding research that leads to the prevention and cure of
asthma and allergic and immunologic disease

What We Do

Interview with Lori Broderick, MD, PhD






 













Lori Broderick, MD, PhD
UC San Diego
Project: “Molecular Mechanisms of Immunodysregulatory Disorders”
$240,000 paid over 3 years
Award Term: July 2018-June 2021


What is the goal of your research?

My focus is on the mechanisms and clinical impacts of pediatric immune dysregulation. The discovery of genes responsible for rare immunologic disorders can lead to a better understanding of fundamental immune pathways in human health and disease. While the availability of whole genome and exome sequencing has improved diagnosis of patients with allergic and immunologic disorders, there is an unmet need for clinician scientists in the specialty who study the biologic consequences of disease gene variants in order to better target therapy.

The overall goal of my research is to further our understanding of genetic immunodysregulatory disorders through the methodical investigation of the molecular basis of underlying disease pathology. I have identified novel genetic variants behind two pediatric immunologic disorders, with the goal that an understanding of the downstream effects of genetic mutations in carefully phenotyped cohorts will delineate specific immunopathogenic pathways and targeted therapy.

Have you always wanted to go into medical research?

I have always wanted to pursue a career in medical research. As a physician-scientist, I have the opportunity to bring clinical questions back to the lab to understand more about challenging diseases. In the lab, I still find so much excitement in discovering something new. I'm very fortunate to have the career I do.

Was it difficult for you to find funding for your research?

The funding environment is difficult for all scientists right now. Young faculty are challenged by a limited track record. The AAAAI Foundation Faculty Development Award is a generous grant for junior faculty to establish themselves during the critical early years of a research career.

How has the Faculty Development Award helped you in your career?

I was absolutely thrilled and honored when Dr. Busse called me in January to tell me that I was going to receive the award. This grant will be instrumental in further establishing my career as an independent translational research immunologist. I look forward to sharing my work with the A/I community over the next 3 years!

Who are your mentors?

Hal M. Hoffman, MD, FAAAAI; Jordan S. Orange, MD, PhD, FAAAAI; David H. Broide, MB, ChB, FAAAAI; Seema S. Aceves, MD, PhD, FAAAAI; Steven A. Wasserman, MD; and Richard B. Bankert, DVM, PhD.